ewhite3

Image
ewhite3@arizona.edu
Phone
(520) 626-3315
Office
Harvill 337C
White, Eddy
Associate Professor of Practice
Associate Professor of Practice, Graduate Interdisciplinary Program in Second Language Acquisition & Teaching

And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.
(Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, 14th Century)

Eddy has been at the University of Arizona since 2011, when he was hired as Assessment Coordinator for the Center for English as Second Language (CESL). This followed being awarded a PhD in Applied Linguistics from Macquarie University (Australia) in 2010.

Professionally, Eddy’s primary interests relate to promoting assessment literacy, and the interconnections between teaching excellence, assessment, and the maximization of student learning. His recent publications include Classroom Assessment: Challenges, Choices and Consequences (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020) and Handbook of Research on Assessment Literacy and Teacher-made Testing in the Language Classroom (IGI Global, 2019).

Teaching and learning are also primary foci of his professional life. This includes developing and teaching courses for the Department of Public & Applied Humanities, and the many opportunities for professional development and learning that come with that.

Interested in all things related to the human condition (and its betterment), Eddy has a keen interest in exploring nature, Shakespeare, and motorcycling (https://youtu.be/VJWjKgZhRLY).

Currently Teaching

PAH 150A2 – Weird Stuff: How to Think About the Supernatural, the Paranormal, and the Mysterious

Few claims seem to arouse more interest, evoke more emotion, and create more confusion than those dealing with the paranormal, the supernatural, or the mysterious. "Weird stuff", as it is often called; astrology, ghosts, fairies, ESP, psychokinesis, UFO abductions, channeling, dowsing, near-death experiences, prophetic dreams, demon possession, time travel, and parapsychology, among others clearly defies conventional wisdom and understanding, yet belief in them is a widespread component of human culture, often exerting a profound effect on people's lives. Why are such unusual beliefs part of the human experience for so many? Why do some people find such phenomena to be compelling, while others reject them outright? How do we decide which claims are credible? What distinguishes rational from irrational claims? This course is designed to help students answer such questions, to understand why people believe weird stuff, and through that process become more empathetic and independent thinkers and learners.

Few claims seem to arouse more interest, evoke more emotion, and create more confusion than those dealing with the paranormal, the supernatural, or the mysterious. "Weird stuff", as it is often called; astrology, ghosts, fairies, ESP, psychokinesis, UFO abductions, channeling, dowsing, near-death experiences, prophetic dreams, demon possession, time travel, and parapsychology, among others clearly defies conventional wisdom and understanding, yet belief in them is a widespread component of human culture, often exerting a profound effect on people's lives. Why are such unusual beliefs part of the human experience for so many? Why do some people find such phenomena to be compelling, while others reject them outright? How do we decide which claims are credible? What distinguishes rational from irrational claims? This course is designed to help students answer such questions, to understand why people believe weird stuff, and through that process become more empathetic and independent thinkers and learners.

PAH 150B1 – Motorcycle Culture: Free Spirits, Easy riders, and the Human Experience

The motorcycle is a global icon, an international symbol of a daring, enviable, sometimes even reckless lifestyle of freedom, adventure, and rebellion. This course explores motorcycle culture around the world and is intended for anyone interested in the human experience, motorcycles, or who is keen to consider the implications of their lifestyle choices. Over the course of the semester, we will examine the facts, myths, and legends surrounding the motorcycle, as well as the ideologies of those who love to ride.

The motorcycle is a global icon, an international symbol of a daring, enviable, sometimes even reckless lifestyle of freedom, adventure, and rebellion. This course explores motorcycle culture around the world and is intended for anyone interested in the human experience, motorcycles, or who is keen to consider the implications of their lifestyle choices. Over the course of the semester, we will examine the facts, myths, and legends surrounding the motorcycle, as well as the ideologies of those who love to ride.

PAH 320 – Working: The Rewards and Costs of Employment

This course is about work and what it does for people and to people. It examines the physical, psychological, and philosophical costs and challenges of employment and how they affect people's lives. Students will examine the overall impact of labor on the psyche and character of the worker, considering the key question, "What does the work do to the worker"?